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Book by children for children celebrates 75th anniversary

Book by children for children celebrates 75th anniversary

Averi Ramsey and Taylor Benson play together in a waiting room filled with toys at East Tennessee Children's Hospital.

They've spent a lot of time there.

They're both being treated for leukemia.

"I just got sick one day and and mommy..." seven year old Averi remembered. "I went to my old doctor and they told me I had to come here."

A former patient, 12 year old Jenna McMillan, wrote a book called East Tennessee from A to Z. It commemorates the 75th anniversary of the hospital.

ETCH holds book signing for book written by and for patients

ETCH holds book signing for book written by and for patients

Folks at East Tennessee Children's Hospital rolled out the red carpet on Thursday. They held a book signing for a new book called "East Tennessee From A to Z."

A 12-year-old patient wrote the book, while current and former patients did the illustrations.

Black McCoy of Independent Insurance Consultants has sponsored the book, meaning the hospital will get all proceeds from book sales. The hospital says the money is very important for making children feel welcome in a hospital.

Cancer survivor hands out scarves to chemotherapy patients

Cancer survivor hands out scarves to chemotherapy patients

An East Tennessee cancer survivor is on a mission to help fellow cancer patients feel sassy when they cover up their head with a hat or scarf.

Samantha Garcia has endured two rounds of breast cancer.

She says she hated the feeling of being stared at when she wore a scarf to cover up her head during cancer treatments.

Garcia wants to do away with that stigma, make scarves sassy, and just support other cancer patients.

So, she and her friend started a Facebook page and received more than three hundred scarves and hats from across the county. 

People dine for the March of Dimes

People dine for the March of Dimes

Nearly 400 people feasted on a variety of foods for the March of Dimes on Sunday night.

The 22nd annual "March of Dimes Signature Chef Auction" was held at the Knoxville Convention Center.

Fifteen chefs donated their time and talents to ensure more babies are born healthy.

During the event, people placed bids in silent and live auctions. Every penny raised will go towards the March of Dimes.

The organization's mission is to prevent birth defects, premature birth and any prenatal problems.

Hundreds walk to stomp out diabetes at World's Fair Park

Hundreds walk to stomp out diabetes at World's Fair Park

Hundreds of people walked in downtown Knoxville to raise awareness and money for those affected by diabetes.

The East Tennessee Office of the American Diabetes Association hosted the "Knoxville Step Out Walk to Stop Diabetes" in the World's Fair Park on Sunday.

Organizers, like Erin Morgan, said their two main goals are to raise money and awareness.

"Diabetes is a disease that's ever present. It's always with you," said Morgan. "So we'd like to reach out to the people in the area who have diabetes to let them know they're not alone."

Skydivers jump for a cure

Skydivers jump for a cure

Eighteen amateur skydivers jumped out of airplanes to fight against cancer on Sunday afternoon.

"The Skydive to Survive" event raised more than $20,000 to go towards the new UT Medical Center Cancer Institute.

Those skydivers said they hoped to demonstrate the courage it takes to conquer cancer. Three members of the Roth family suited up and skydived for their mom, Rita, who is currently battling breast cancer for the second time.

Rita Roth said she is grateful for her family's efforts to find a cure.

Thousands participate in the 'Race for the Cure'

Thousands participate in the 'Race for the Cure'

Thousands of East Tennesseans celebrated breast cancer survivors and those who passed away from this disease at the Komen-Knoxville Race for the Cure on Saturday morning.

10News reporter Allison Bybee started the runners with a blow horn. More than 10,000 people ran or walked, filling the downtown streets with pink.

Organizers hoped to raise $900,000 through Saturday's race. Those profits will help provide cancer research and support. Seventy-five percent of the money raised stays in Tennessee, helping cancer patients pay for bills and food.